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The ReStoration Corner

Spring Cleaning: What to Toss and What to Donate

Posted by ReStore Staff on Mar 13, 2018 4:01:59 PM

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Sun shining late into the evening, warming temperatures, and melting snow can only mean one thing: Spring is near. And it's the perfect time do some spring cleaning.

Before you get trash-happy, consider items you can donate. You may be surprised to find that much of what you don't need or want anymore can be donated. You'll not only keep items out of the landfill, but you'll make another family very happy.

But where do you start? We'll help you identify some of those things you didn't know you could donate (and tell you where to donate them) and some things that are better sent to the trash.

Things You Didn't Know You Could Donate

These recommendations are current as of March 2018, so make sure you regularly check our website for updated donation guidelines.

Sports Equipment

Did you upgrade to a new catcher's mitt, grow out of your hockey skates, get a new softball bat for your birthday, or buy a new bicycle? Instead of letting the old stuff collect dust in the garage, donate it to Goodwill or resell them to Play it Again Sports. Rest assured, someone else will be overjoyed to find your equipment and buy it at an affordable price.

Eyeglasses

If you wear glasses, you're well aware that your prescription changes year to year, requiring you to buy a new pair of glasses. So, what do you do with the old ones? Unless they can be used as a costume prop for Halloween, donate them.

Typically, your local Lion's Club will accept them, or drop them off at a nearby eye doctor's office.

Lawn Mowers

Although not typically part of your spring cleaning regimen, if you have an old lawnmower in the shed or you recently upgraded to a new one, you can donate the old one instead of letting it sit and collect dust. Your local Salvation Army will take it, and sometimes local mechanics will accept it and use it for parts.

Appliances

Did you recently renovate your laundry room, complete with a new washing machine and dryer? What happened to the old ones? If you still have them, consider donating them to one of Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity's ReStore locations, as long as they fit under ReStore’s Appliance Guidelines.

Same goes for that kitchen renovation. We’ll take your unused refrigerator (no commercial models, no built-ins), freezer, stove or vent hood. (Note: Appliance donations to the ReStore must be less than 10 years old. Determine the age of your appliance here.)

Building Materials

We know that with homeownership comes a list of projects to complete around the house. Whether you did some plumbing or there's still extra lumber from that deck you built last summer, there's a place to donate your leftover building materials. Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity's ReStore locations will accept items such as:

  • Copper or PVC pipe
  • Lumber
  • Plywood
  • Tile (new only)
  • Flooring (new only)

Click here for a complete list of accepted items.

Cars, RVs, Boats

Have a car sitting in your driveway that hasn't run for years? Maybe it's an old RV or boat? Lucky for you, our Cars for Homes program takes donated boats, cars, and other large vehicles and sells them to raise money for our homebuilding projects. This includes cars, boats, and RVs, even if they don't currently run. And your donation is tax deductible.

Before you donate your vehicle, be sure to call The Salvation Army since not all vehicles are accepted at all of their locations.

Things You Should Throw Out

Outdated Medicine and Vitamins

While you're spring cleaning, you may find some leftover medications that you no longer need or that are expired. Although these medications should be discarded, it's best not to just throw them in the trash or flush them down the toilet, where they will most likely end up in a landfill or the water supply, respectively.

Your best option for both expired meds and vitamins is to locate a "take back" program in your area. Your local pharmacy might have one, or Hennepin County's Medical Disposal site can help you locate one. If you can't find one of these programs, call your primary care physician and see if they have a "black box program." Many doctor's offices have an expired medicine pick-up service with their biohazardous waste program and can add your meds to their black box. It doesn't hurt to ask.

Expired Food

It's a good idea to clean out your kitchen cabinets or pantry while spring cleaning. Check all the canned goods for expiration dates, and throw away any cans that are expired, badly dented, or bulging. Give your refrigerator a good cleaning, too, by getting rid of expired food and uneaten leftovers. Then, wipe down all the shelves and bins.

Will Twin Cities Habitat ReStore take my donation?

Don’t worry — Even if you have items that you don't think you can transport to a ReStore location, you can request a pickup from some of our locations.

If you found some miscellaneous items you no longer want or need during your cleanup but they weren’t listed above, check out the ReStore’s donation guidelines – there’s much more on there.

Now that you've cleaned the clutter, enjoy spring and summer with a clear conscience. You've earned it!

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Topics: Tips and Tricks, Donate